Every month I’ll be interviewing an author who writes historically-influenced fiction, and introducing you to some fantastic new writing talent. Their genres vary, but all of them are writing stories set in the 19th and early 20th centuries. 

This month’s featured author is Tammy Lash. Tammy writes inspirational historical fiction, and  her most recent book is White Wolf and the Ash Princess. You can contact Tammy through her website, or on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

 

How long have you been writing and what got you started?

My husband and I have been children’s church teachers for over twenty years. I’ve always considered myself a storyteller, not a writer. I have only been writing for five years or so. I began writing when my pastor encouraged me to write my stories down and try to share them outside the church. I started where my love for story began. The Children’s Bible Hour was my favourite radio show as a little girl. I submitted a devotional to Keys for Kids (the new name for this ministry) and one of my three short stories was accepted!

What are the best and worst things about being an author?

I love creating different scenarios for my characters in my head! It’s so fun to be able to choose a path for them to follow and see how they handle the situations I give them. The worst thing about being an author is the frustration that comes when the words don’t flow and I’m stuck on a chapter for weeks—sometimes months.

What’s your favourite historical time period to write about and why?

I like sixteenth /seventeenth century early America because things here were new. America was a wild, blank slate. I wish I could hop in a time machine and visit. I wouldn’t want to live there forever, though. I love my hot showers and coffee maker! But, then again, my character Jonathan Gudwyne is an inventor. He and my husband would come up with some pretty clever inventions to make life comfortable, I’m sure!

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve researched in relation to your writing?

The weirdest thing would be dentures. I wanted to know if real teeth were ever used.  It grossed me out to find out that, yep, human teeth were indeed used, as well as animal teeth. Ick! This information was pretty valuable to my story. It’s a small mention in White Wolf and the Ash Princess, but it will make a bigger statement in the coming Letters from the Dragon’s Son.

If you could travel anywhere in time and space, when and where would it be?

Totally my early America sixteenth/seventeenth centuries!

Where do you find creative inspiration?

Something happens when I run. I don’t know what it is about it that does it, but I always solve all my story problems during a jog. Music provides a big portion of inspiration, so that may be part of it. Nature provides another big avenue of inspiration. Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is my go-to place for any wild aspects of my writings.

What’s your favourite historical resource?

I have a Native American natural medicine handbook that I got from my dentist friend who is also an outdoor enthusiast. I also use several Ojibwe dictionaries for the language that I sprinkle though out my books.

The best place in the world to write is…

In the fall and winter: in my bed with my electric blanket! In the summer: on my porch swing. My hope is that someday soon my family and I will be living in the best place on the planet—Michigan’s Upper Peninsula—where inspiration flows like an endless pot of coffee! Fingers crossed!

When you’re not writing, what do you get up to?

I love to bake so I can lick the bowl and beaters and get sick on the dough and batter! I also have one of our kids left to homeschool, so even though his work is mostly self-guiding, he still needs the occasional mom help.

What are you currently working on?

Currently I’m working on Letters from the Dragon’s Son. It’s the sequel to White Wolf and the Ash Princess. White Wolf is the story of Izzy’s journey to the New World where she uncovers painful secrets while discovering a new culture. White Wolf is an adventure and it’s a story of forgiveness, learning to love, and allowing oneself to be pushed beyond where they are comfortable. Letters focuses on Jonathan’s journey towards the same elements as Izzy, except this story is the flip side of White Wolf. How does a traveller who has lived the life of adventure learn these same lessons? By stripping everything away. Jonathan’s story is a painful one, but an important piece of the puzzle for readers to learn ALL aspects of forgiveness. Monsters (or dragons) need our forgiveness, too.

Every month I’ll be interviewing an author who writes historically-influenced fiction, and introducing you to some fantastic new writing talent. Their genres vary, but all of them are writing stories set in the 19th and early 20th centuries. 

This month’s featured author is fantasy and steampunk writer M.K. Wiseman. She’s about to release Kithseeker, the second book in her Bookminder trilogy. You can find her through her website, or on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, where she goes by the handle @FaublesFables.

How long have you been writing and what got you started?

My writing journey started in earnest in the [northern] summer of 2004. I was recovering from a rather serious surgery and had a lot of time of my hands plus some very vivid post-hospital dreams. One, in particular, stuck with me for reasons unknown. I spent the rest of my summer break figuring out the story behind it. That became the crux of my first novel, The Bookminder. However, the manuscript sat in a drawer, only partially finished, until a number of years later when I knocked together a short story for fun, simply because I had heard about a publisher accepting submissions for an anthology. Three short stories in, three anthologies later, I’d unearthed my old half-cooked novel and started to write full-time.

What are the best and worst things about being an author?

The misery of it all. (Mostly kidding there. Mostly.) Truthfully, writing is a rather solitary pursuit. Or, really, it’s a very private pursuit. I run, leap, shout, scream, do magic spells, and go travelling for hours a day—and all inside my head. It’s exhausting. And then I emerge from this imaginary space and try to cook dinner or iron a few shirts. It’s a little like wilfully choosing to be a bit mad.

*Note, I did answer the question . . . The best and the worst, for me, are all rolled up into this same, ever-curious experience of truly believing your imaginary friends are real, and then making them so, and then going out amongst people at the grocery store and pretending you’re absolutely normal on the inside and that you did not just murder a man in the Old West a half an hour ago.

What’s your favourite historical time period to write about and why?

Late 1800s. For the simple reason that there is ever so much more information available on that time period than, say, the 1600s. (Information of the flavor I use, that is. For example, I adore historical map overlays. Also, I love the idea that a building I am writing about is still standing and might be visited by the intrepid.) Additionally, English is much closer to our modern use when you hit the end of the 19th century. e.g. If I want a character to simply say “Hello” I can, actually, do so.

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve researched in relation to your writing?

I once had to determine whether there was a train route in Nebraska, in 1890, that crossed over a trestle at the exact point of a ley line.

If you could travel anywhere in time and space, when and where would it be?

This is a terrible thing to ask a Whovian! 😉 😉

Though the thought terrifies me, I think I should like to go somewhere into the far future and see how far we all travelled out into the stars, if world peace was ever found . . . and, essentially, whether we humans “make it” or not in the end.

Where do you find creative inspiration?

I think the heart of everything I write stems from “things I love.” I don’t sit on a bench and people-watch, or collect interesting dialogue overheard at a coffee shop. I don’t put enemies into my books and give them gruesome deaths, as the old threat goes.

Each story is a love letter of sorts, me “geeking out” and sharing a place, a concept, an interest that I hold dear . . . and then taking it out of the personal so that I can deny up, down, left, right that my characters have any of me in them. 😉

What’s your favourite historical resource?

I absolutely adore the National Library of Scotland’s map overlays. I love, love, love this resource and am dropping a link here so that folks can go explore it. Historical maps + Bing overlay for easy modern reference? Amazing. Thank you, National Library of Scotland. Thank you.

The best place in the world to write is…

I think my favorite spot for writing is the Memorial Union Terrace at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Good light, good movement and sound—a perfect hum of distant distraction and productivity. A lake to look at when my eyes need a break. Access to good foods and drinks.  . . . And there’s always a chance I might run across an old sailing buddy who needs an extra hand on a keelboat for the afternoon. Being on a campus, the place is simply steeped in ambition, the air heavy with endless, lovely potential.

When you’re not writing, what do you get up to?

Reading, of course. But I also play with a Croatian folk orchestra (I play brač) and so have to keep those skills sharp. I juggle a bit; unicycle for fun; am trying to learn a couple languages via phone apps (I figure that with such a marvelous technology, I ought use it to better myself); I am a big fan of anime; I have a love/hate relationship with running; and, this year, am learning to play my dad’s accordion. You know, hobbies. 😉

What are you currently working on?

Looking to finish the Bookminder trilogy. Which is a huge project, really, and ought to be filling my time. But I also have several back-burner projects, one of which I am actively shopping, one which I pick at/edit from time to time, and a third—my current favorite—which will require endless research and, potentially, a trip to finish.

Every month I’ll be interviewing an author who writes historically-influenced fiction, and introducing you to some fantastic new writing talent. Their genres vary, but all of them are writing stories set in the 19th and early 20th centuries. 

This month’s featured author is Guy Worthey. Guy writes young adult adventure, specifically 1920s noir with steampunk elements. His most recent book is Ace Carroway and the Great War. You can get in touch with him via his website or Facebook page, or on Twitter (@guyworthey).

How long have you been writing and what got you started?

I’ve only been seriously writing fiction-for-publication for a couple of years. However, my first publication was in second grade, when the teacher collected poems from the class. She retyped them, mimeographed them (yep, before photocopiers!), and made books held together with brass brads. Each kid made their own covers by gluing the letters P-O-E-T-R-Y onto construction paper. I was enthralled by the experience. The poem was, in its entirety, “Once, when flowers popped, they exploded.”

What are the best and worst things about being an author?

Best: writing.

Worst: editing.

I bet all the authors say that.

On the interface with the outside world, however, I’m really torn by the childish need to seek approval and the introvert’s instinct to just hide. So, on that axis, the best thing is the good review and the worst thing is the bad review.

Finally, on the axis of coffee:

Best: coffee.

Worst: coffee runs out.

What’s your favourite historical time period to write about and why?

I can’t pick just one! I love the noir period, of course. I really want to write a steampunk story some time. I grew up on a steady diet of medieval fantasy, so I’m always drawn to a swords-and-sorcery yarn. Personally, I avoid contemporary, post-apocalyptic, and anything where people have elongated canines.

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve researched in relation to your writing?

Underwear, maybe. Specifically, the problem of having a 1920s woman who does athletic things.

The thermodynamics of jet engines, maybe. Or, how the Hindenburg’s crew actually handled that huge thing.

Then there is the tool called a breast drill. I euphemistically called it a chest drill to avoid teens snickering about it. It’s a heavy-duty drill that you lean into to apply pressure, and that’s how it gets its name. It’s got a long handle for extra leverage that the operator spins with their right hand while guiding their aim with their left hand.

If you could travel anywhere in time and space, when and where would it be?

Definitely the future. As much as I love various past times and places, I really really really want to jump a couple hundred years forward and see how the moon base is coming along and check on the Mars colony and see if we have found life around some other star.

Where do you find creative inspiration?

I get inspiration from almost everything. Music, chance remarks overheard, reading, dreaming, or simply listening to other people talk about what is important to them.

What’s your favourite historical resource?

A good, dusty, overstuffed secondhand bookstore! Digging around in such a place is where I have found some of my best references. You find crazy, quirky stuff lurking in the corners of such shops. My most fervent hope is that internet doesn’t kill off these shops.

The best place in the world to write is…

By a window overlooking the storm-lashed Scottish seaside cliffs.

I imagine. Never done that, actually. I do have a window, though, and I try to sit by it. I actually enjoy typing on a keyboard to write, though I prefer to read in the traditional manner of ink on paper pages.

When you’re not writing, what do you get up to?

I have a day job, but also plenty of hobbies. Foremost among them is probably jazz bass. I never get tired of playing in a hot combo. In general, I allow myself to get distracted. The occasional wild goose chase is good for a body.

What are you currently working on?

I’m finishing #2 in my Ace Carroway series, called Ace Carroway Around the World. This means I’m editing. Sigh. As I edit, I try to not get seduced by the dark side, such as writing a spinoff or going back to my half-drafted fantasy trilogy. Anyway, Ace #2 should be ready for release by March or April.